[Journal of a Harvard student and teacher at Phillips Academy, Andover.] Diary from Jan. 1, 1803, to Sep. 2, 1804 [cover-title]. David Tenney Kimball.
[Journal of a Harvard student and teacher at Phillips Academy, Andover.] Diary from Jan. 1, 1803, to Sep. 2, 1804 [cover-title].
[Journal of a Harvard student and teacher at Phillips Academy, Andover.] Diary from Jan. 1, 1803, to Sep. 2, 1804 [cover-title].
[Journal of a Harvard student and teacher at Phillips Academy, Andover.] Diary from Jan. 1, 1803, to Sep. 2, 1804 [cover-title].
[Journal of a Harvard student and teacher at Phillips Academy, Andover.] Diary from Jan. 1, 1803, to Sep. 2, 1804 [cover-title].
[Journal of a Harvard student and teacher at Phillips Academy, Andover.] Diary from Jan. 1, 1803, to Sep. 2, 1804 [cover-title].
[Journal of a Harvard student and teacher at Phillips Academy, Andover.] Diary from Jan. 1, 1803, to Sep. 2, 1804 [cover-title].
[Journal of a Harvard student and teacher at Phillips Academy, Andover.] Diary from Jan. 1, 1803, to Sep. 2, 1804 [cover-title].
[Journal of a Harvard student and teacher at Phillips Academy, Andover.] Diary from Jan. 1, 1803, to Sep. 2, 1804 [cover-title].
[Journal of a Harvard student and teacher at Phillips Academy, Andover.] Diary from Jan. 1, 1803, to Sep. 2, 1804 [cover-title].

[Journal of a Harvard student and teacher at Phillips Academy, Andover.] Diary from Jan. 1, 1803, to Sep. 2, 1804 [cover-title].

[Cambridge, Andover, Mass.], Jan. 1803–Sept. 1804. 8vo (21 x 18 cm), original buff wrappers with manuscript title on front wrapper. 64 pp. of manuscript, 2 pp. index; with small archive of Kimball family papers.

A journal kept by noted Ipswich, Massachusetts minister David T. Kimball during his final year of studies at Harvard University and Harvard Divinity School, and a year of teaching at Phillips Andover Academy.

Rev. David Tenney Kimball (1782–1860) was a prominent abolitionist and Pastor of the First Parish in Ipswich, Mass.—a ministry he held for over fifty years, from 1806 until his death. As this journal chronicles, Kimball graduated from Harvard in 1803 and taught during the 1803-1804 school year at Phillips Academy in Andover, Mass. While at Harvard, Kimball studied with the notable American theologian David Tappan (1752–1803) who occupied the Hollis Chair at Harvard Divinity School until his death in 1803. Kimball often notes attending Dr. Tappan’s lectures, and following Tappan’s death he pens a powerful 3 pp. tribute to his teacher. The death of Tappan—who was a theological moderate—precipitated a rift between liberal and conservative Christians at the Harvard Divinity School, which centered on the issue of who should fill the vacancy.

Many of Kimball’s entries from his time at Harvard record his reflections on classes, books read, and subjects of study, including poetry, the classics, Zeno’s paradox, Shakespeare, Burlamaqui, various memoirs, astronomy, geography, biblical texts and verses, religious practices, and so on. Some entries deal with Greek societies, social events, meetings, deaths, to-do lists, elections, public worships and lectures, attending meetings of the Andover Politico Theologico et Literati Society, walks to Boston and elsewhere, etc. In an entry on p. 17, Kimball notes a visit to Harvard by John Quincy Adams on 12 April 1803:

The class underwent the last public examination. We had a very handsome address by John Q. Adams Esq. He was happy to express the satisfaction, he with the other gentlemen of the committee had experienced from the evidence, this day given, of our acquisition, made during the year past in the several branches, to which we had attended.

On 31 Aug. 1803, the Harvard commencement takes place: “The company present was very respectable, and the performances conducted in a manner, that afforded the highest satisfaction to the audience. His Excellency the Governor was escorted to Cambridge by the Roxbury troop of horse.” Kimball details the literary exercises of the celebration; those who were conferred a degree (Bachelors and Masters students); capstone projects (Kimball’s co-authored project is entitled, “An English Colloquy upon ‘The Influence, which the discovery of America has had upon the state of mankind’”), and a catalogue of books assigned at Harvard from his freshman to senior year.

By Sept. 1803 Kimball is teaching at Phillips Andover Academy. While there he increasingly writes on matters of prayer and religion—which foreshadow the ministry he will begin in just two years. On 21 Aug. 1804, he notes that the annual examination of Phillips Andover Academy has begun, which brings to a close the school-year. He remarks: “With pleasant mingled with painful emotion, took my leave of the scholars. The year which I have spent in the academy, has passed pleasantly away, I think profitably to myself, and, I hope, not unprofitably to others. In taking my leave of the scholars, I wish them well in the name of the Lord. I pray for their literary improvement, but especially for their advancement in divine knowledge.” The journal ends with a brief sketch of Phillips Andover Academy and its aims.

As a minister, Kimball became acquainted with numerous influential figures. In his Ipswich in the Massachusetts Bay Colony (1905), Thomas F. Waters notes that Kimball’s diaries record visits to his Meeting House by ministers Lyman Beecher, Calvin Stowe, and Leonard Woods, as well as Daniel Webster Catherine Beecher, Ann Hazletine Judson, N. P. Willis, William Lloyd Garrison, Caleb Cushing, Rufus Choate, and the founders of the Ipswich Female Seminary, Zilpah Grant and Mary Lyon; the latter went on to found Mount Holyoke College.

Included with this journal is one of Kimball’s manuscript household account-books; a few letters to Kimball, a family gathering book, and miscellaneous family papers and photographs.

SOME REPRESENTATIVE PASSAGES:

15 Jan. 1803 “Finished Maria William’s letters. These letters, written in a very pleasing, elegant style, while she was in France, contain a great variety of interesting information concerning the most important events, that have lately occurred in that country.”

4 March–17 March 1803 “Eve attended the theatre. Highly entertained with the much admired play of the Mountaineers. Don Octavian by Mr. Taylor; Kilmallock by Mr. Rignall… A violent storm & shipwreck naturally represented… Read Shakespeare’s Tempest. He made this plot instrumental to the production of many characters, diversified with boundless invention, & preserved with profound skill in nature, extensive knowledge of opinion, and accurate observation of life.”

4 April 1803 “This, being the day for electing Governor, Lieut. Gov. & Senators in this Commonwealth…upon recounting the votes there appeared a majority on the federal side. The votes for Gov. were His Excellency Gov. Strong 141, Elbridge Gerry Esq. 130…”

7 May 1803 “Read a critical dissertation on the poems of Ossian by Dr. Blair. Ossian is sublime; he is pathetic. In strength of imagination, in grandeur of sentiment, in native majesty of passion he is not inferior to Homer, nor Virgil. If he flows not always like a clear stream, he breaks forth often like a torrent of fire…”

14 June “Dr. Tappan delivered a very affectionate discourse from these words, “Farewell; be perfect.” He most fervently addressed the the throne of grace, wishing us well in the name of our Lord. In his discourse he warmly urged the importance of integrity in whatever situation we may be placed. If we engaged in the instruction of youth, if connected in domestic life, if elected to places of public confidence, if practical law, physics, or divinity be our profession, firm & unshaken integrity will be infinitely important.”

20 June 1803 “This being the last time of attending the Dr. he briefly bid us farewell. Wishing the divine blessings to attend us during the residue of life; that we may act well our parts, as scholars, as gentlemen, as Christians.”

13 July 1803 “Finished The Coquette, a novel, founded on fact, written in a very pleasing stile. We admire the openness, sincerity, and hoest indignation of Mr. Boyer; we detest the actions, but are compelled to drop a tear over the untimely grave of Eliza Wharton…”

29 Aug. 1803 “Dr. Tappan was consigned to the silent tomb. Previous to their internment his remains were carried to the meeting house, preceded by the students and followed by a respectable procession, where after prayer by the Rev. Dr. Lathrope a sermon was delivered by the Rev. [?] Holmes from Acts 11.24, “For he was a good man.” The historian, who collects brilliant examples of virtue for the instruction of mankind will dwell with the character of delight on Dr. Tappan. He possessed in an uncommon degree the various qualifications, which adorn the gentleman, the scholar, and the Christian… He held a distinguished rank among the literati of our country… The glory of Dr. Tappan’s character shone with unequaled resplendence in piety to God and benevolence to man… He was qualified in an eminent degree to make men wise and good… Deeply is this loss felt by our University.”

24 March 1804 “Hodges dead! My friend, my brother! How can I part [from] thee, O Hodges, dearly beloved! We took honest council together, and walked the paths of silence in company. Together we conversed on heavenly things; together we trod the pleasant & peaceful paths of wisdom. Our friendship was sincere; our love was mutual… mourn the sudden removal of one animated by social love, enlightened by real knowledge, & warmed by heavily devotion.”

July 1804 “Blotted out means forgiveness in the most extensive sense of the term. Have mercy upon me O Lord, according to thy loving kindness, according to the multitude of thy tender mercies… The design of religion is to draw us near to God… The duty of secret prayer. Reason teaches us the propensity, the duty of secret prayer. This arises from our individual dependence on God for every misery, our individual sins, our individual wants… Advantages of secret prayer. 1. Be acquainted with God. How delightful to commence in secret with him who seeth in secret? To retire from the view of man, & hover out our souls before the Lord, our maker, to plead remission of our sins, dedicate ourselves to God, and supplicate the divine favor.”

REFERENCES: Historic Ipswich. 8 Meeting House Green, the David T. Kimball House (1808) at historicipswich.org; Larsen, Timothy & Michael Ledger-Lomas, Eds., The Oxford History of Protestant Dissenting Traditions, Volume III: The Nineteenth Century (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017); Waters, Thomas F. Ipswich in the Massachusetts Bay Colony (Ipswich Historical Society: Ipswich, Mass., 1905).

CONDITION: Covers moderately soiled, chipped and worn; part of contents detached from the covers.

Item #5163

Price: $2,500.00

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