Oration on the Life and Character of Gilbert Motier de Lafayette. Delivered at the request of both houses of the Congress of the United States, before them, in the House of Representatives at Washington, On the 31st of December, 1834. By John Quincy Adams, a Member of the House. John Quincy Adams.
Oration on the Life and Character of Gilbert Motier de Lafayette. Delivered at the request of both houses of the Congress of the United States, before them, in the House of Representatives at Washington, On the 31st of December, 1834. By John Quincy Adams, a Member of the House.
Oration on the Life and Character of Gilbert Motier de Lafayette. Delivered at the request of both houses of the Congress of the United States, before them, in the House of Representatives at Washington, On the 31st of December, 1834. By John Quincy Adams, a Member of the House.

Oration on the Life and Character of Gilbert Motier de Lafayette. Delivered at the request of both houses of the Congress of the United States, before them, in the House of Representatives at Washington, On the 31st of December, 1834. By John Quincy Adams, a Member of the House.

Washington D.C.: Gales and Seaton, 1835. 8vo (8.5” x 5.25”), original printed wrappers. 94 pp. Inscribed by Adams.

First edition of this memorial tribute to Lafayette, inscribed by Adams at the head of the front wrapper: “John Brown Francis from the author J.Q.A.” Additionally, Francis has written on the title-page, “this oration sent to me by the Ex: President JBF.”

At the time Adams inscribed this work, Francis was serving as the thirteenth Governor of Rhode Island. In his oration delivered on 31 December 1834, Adams offers a captivating overview of Lafayette’s contributions to American liberty as well as his activities in the decades following the Revolutionary War—in particular, his involvement in the French Revolution and the subsequent French governments. As a result of his services, Lafayette was granted Honorary Citizenship of the U.S. in 1824.

Adams reflects here “upon the life and character of a man whose life was, for nearly threescore years, the history of the civilized world—of a man, of whose character, to say that it is indissolubly identified with the Revolution of our Independence, is little more than to mark the features of his childhood—of a man, the personified image of self-circumscribed liberty.” The text concludes with an eight-page appendix recording Congressional actions initiated by Adams on 21 June 1834 following Lafayette’s death. “Adams moved the following resolution, viz. Resolved, That a Committee be appointed, on the part of this House, to join such Committee as may be appointed on the part of the Senate, to consider and report by what token of respect and affection it may be proper for the Congress of the United States to express the deep sensibility of the Nation to the event of the decease of General Lafayette.”

Born in Philadelphia, John Brown Francis (1791–1864) served as the 13th Governor of Rhode Island (1833–1838) and as U. S. Senator from Rhode Island (1831–1842). Francis also served as a member of the Rhode Island House of Representatives (1821–1829), the board of trustees of Brown University (1828–1857), and as chancellor of Brown University (1841–1854).

REFERENCES: American Imprints 29946; Sabin 295; Jackson, p. 208.

CONDITION: Good, spine paper split from head to foot, old vertical crease through entire pamphlet, some creasing and folding at corners, moderate foxing.

Item #5550

Price: $3,500.00

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