Proposals by John S. Wiesling and Francis B. Shunk, of Harrisburg, for Publishing by subscription, The Proceedings relative to calling the Conventions of 1776 and 1790 [with autograph letter by Shunk on integral leaf]. Francis B. Shunk, John S. Wiestling.
Proposals by John S. Wiesling and Francis B. Shunk, of Harrisburg, for Publishing by subscription, The Proceedings relative to calling the Conventions of 1776 and 1790 [with autograph letter by Shunk on integral leaf].
Proposals by John S. Wiesling and Francis B. Shunk, of Harrisburg, for Publishing by subscription, The Proceedings relative to calling the Conventions of 1776 and 1790 [with autograph letter by Shunk on integral leaf].

Proposals by John S. Wiesling and Francis B. Shunk, of Harrisburg, for Publishing by subscription, The Proceedings relative to calling the Conventions of 1776 and 1790 [with autograph letter by Shunk on integral leaf].

Harrisburg, PA, May 11, 1825. 4to bifolium (12.5” x 8”), 1 p. of printed text, 1 ms. letter on . Docketed, “John Neal Esq., care of the Bank of Washington, Washington, Penn.” Red stamp.

A prospectus for a book relating to the establishment of the constitution of the state of Pennsylvania, with a letter by the publisher, Francis R. Shunk, who later served as the tenth governor of Pennsylvania.

The book in question—estimated to contain about 500 pages—was to include minutes of the Convention that formed the Constitution of Pennsylvania, together with the charter to William Penn, the Constitutions of 1776 and 1790, and a view of the proceedings of the convention of 1776 and the council of censors. The nine parts of the projected volume are detailed. The specifics of the printed work are detailed at bottom as well, covering the paper used, advertising, subscription, newspapers, etc. The book was indeed published in 1825, under the title The proceedings relative to calling the conventions of 1776 and 1790 : the minutes of the convention that formed the present constitution of Pennsylvania, together with the charter to William Penn, the constitutions of 1776 and 1790, and a view of the proceedings of the Convention of 1776, and the Council of Censors. John Wiestling was the printer.

Shunk writes to John Neal of the Bank of Washington in Washington, Pennsylvania, as follows: “I am compelled to premise that I am not certain that I have rightly understood your signature. I received your letter and have enclosed a certified copy of the law you want, for which I have paid as appears by endorsement one dollar and 50 cents. I have not yet seen Mr. Porter. I have taken the liberty to write to you on one of our proposals for publishing a book which will I hope under present circumstances be acceptable to the people. I expect Mr. Knight and Mr. MCreery[?] will patronage the book. Should it meet with your approbation I shall be much indebted to you for assisting me in the circulation of this volume. The books from which the compilation will be made, may be said to b[e?] … of print and they contain much information that is pertinent to the qu[estion] which the legislature has submitted to the people for decision. Pardon [me] for taking this liberty. [PS:] we expect to have the work ready for delivery about the 1 of next August.”

Born in Pennsylvania, Francis R. Shunk (1788–1848) was a lawyer who after fighting in the War of 1812 served as Secretary of the state Canal Commission (1829–39), an important position in the government when major canal, railroad and other public works projects were planned and undertaken. In 1839 he was appointed Secretary of the Commonwealth, serving until 1842. A substitute candidate for governor in 1845 after the death of Democratic candidate Henry A. Muhlenberg, he was elected and served part of a second term beginning in 1847 but was forced to resign in July 1848 after contracting tuberculosis. He died eleven days later.

CONDITION: Good, old folds, loss of a few words in letter.

Item #5576

Price: $375.00