[Henry Dearborn family association sammelband.]. Henry Dearborn.
[Henry Dearborn family association sammelband.]
[Henry Dearborn family association sammelband.]
[Henry Dearborn family association sammelband.]
[Henry Dearborn family association sammelband.]
[Henry Dearborn family association sammelband.]
[Henry Dearborn family association sammelband.]
[Henry Dearborn family association sammelband.]
[Henry Dearborn family association sammelband.]
[Henry Dearborn family association sammelband.]
[Henry Dearborn family association sammelband.]

[Henry Dearborn family association sammelband.]

8vo (8.25” x 5.5”), marbled boards, later leather spine with gilt short-titles and authors. 11 pamphlets, 192 pp. Boston; Augusta and Hallowell, Maine, and other locales, 1800–1810.

An intact and appealing sammelband of eleven pamphlets including two orations by army officer, congressman, and secretary of war Henry Dearborn, of Gardiner, Maine, as well as an interesting pamphlet on the Louisiana Purchase. This sammelband was evidently compiled by Dearborn’s son-in-law Joshua Wingate, who served under Dearborn: three presentation inscriptions bear Wingate’s name, in addition to that of his brother Joseph F. Wingate. Also included here are four early Maine imprints (pre-1820).

Born in Hampton, New Hampshire, Henry Dearborn (1751–1829) was a doctor prior to the Revolutionary War. In view of the looming British threat, Dearborn organized a militia company, and, after learning of the fighting at Lexington and Concord, accompanied his sixty men to Cambridge. His company was incorporated in the regiment of Col. John Stark and fought in the battle of Bunker Hill in 1775. In Sept. 1775, Dearborn took part in Benedict Arnold's failed expedition to Quebec, the journal he kept constituting an important source of information on the campaign. During the assault on Quebec, Dearborn was taken prisoner and later exchanged, after which he took part in the campaign against Burgoyne. At Valley Forge the winter of 1777–78, he fought in the battle of Monmouth the following June—the action of his regiment receiving praise from General Washington. In 1779, he played a central role in the expedition against the Iroquois Confederacy. Later joining Washington's staff, he participated at the siege of Yorktown. In 1783, Dearborn settled in Gardiner, Maine where, upon the organization of the U.S. government, he was appointed by Washington as marshal of the Maine militia (1789–93). He served in the U.S. House of Representatives from the District of Maine between 1793 and 1797. In 1797, Augusta, Maine was renamed after Henry’s daughter, Augusta Dearborn. Under President Thomas Jefferson, he served as Secretary of War (1801–09), and acted as commanding general of the U.S. Army in the War of 1812. In 1818, Dearborn’s “correct account” of the Battle of Bunker Hill was published in which he accused Gen. Israel Putnam of inaction and poor leadership during the battle. The article caused a major, long-lasting controversy amongst veterans of the war and various historians. Three of the present orations (one of which is by Dearborn) were delivered in connection with the Bunker Hill Association, the organization that designed and constructed the Bunker Hill Monument.

Born in Essex County, Mass., Joshua Wingate (1773–1843) graduated from Harvard and married Henry Dearborn’s daughter Julia (1781–1867). Wingate served as chief clerk for his father-in-law in the War Department, and was named postmaster at Portland, Maine in 1804. Two years later, President Thomas Jefferson appointed Wingate as the customs collector for Bath, Maine. In addition to his duties as collector, Wingate served as a brigadier general in Maine’s militia and represented Bath at Maine’s constitutional convention in 1819. After resigning as collector in 1820 in favor of his brother Joseph F. Wingate, he lived in Portland, where he engaged in politics. He ran unsuccessfully for governor and served as president of the board of directors of the Portland branch of the Bank of the United States. Wingate was a founding member of the Maine Historical Society.

Joseph Ferdinand Wingate (1786–?) was a U.S. Representative from Maine. Born in Haverhill, Mass., Wingate engaged in mercantile business in Bath, Maine, where he would also serve as collector of customs from 1820 to 1824. He was as member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives in 1818 and 1819, and was elected to the Twentieth and Twenty-first Congresses (1827–31).

CONTENTS:

Dearborn, Henry A. An Oration Pronounced at Boston on the Fourth Day of July, 1811, Before the Supreme Executive and in Presence of the Bunker Hill Association. Boston: Printed by Munroe & French, Printers to the State, 1811. 8vo, 15 pp., inscription (likely a presentation inscription, part of which has been excised) at title-page, “Joshua Wing[ate].”

[with]

Dearborn, Henry A. S. An Oration Delivered at Salem, on the Fourth of July, 1806. Salem: Printed at the Register Office, 1806. 8vo, 14 pp.

[with]

White, William Charles. An Oration, In Commemoration of the Anniversary of American Independence. Delivered in Boston, July 4th, 1809, at the request of the Bunker Hill Association … To which is added, An Introductory Address, by David Everett. Boston: J. Belcher, printer, 1809. 8vo, 12, [6] pp., title-page inscribed, “Majr.[?] J[oseph]. Wingate Jr. from his brother Jos. F. Winga[te].”

[with]

Weston, Nathan. An Oration, Pronounced July 4th 1810; Before the Republican Citizens of Augusta and the Neighbouring Towns. In Commemoration of American Independence Hallowell: Printed by N. Cheever, 1810. 8vo, 19 pp., title-page inscribed, “[to] Joshua Wingate from his friend R. C. V[?].”

[with]

Brazer, Samuel. Address, Pronounced at Worcester, on May 12th, 1804, in Commemoration of the Cession of Louisiana to the United States. Worcester: Sewall Goodridge, 1804. 8vo, 15, [1] pp.

Historian Peter J. Kastor notes that Samuel Brazer (1785–1823) was among a number of pamphleteers and editorialists of his day who were “eager to help secure approval of the [Louisiana Purchase] and extend federal rule west of the Mississippi [and] claimed that the greatest benefit of the purchase was the peaceful resolution of the Mississippi Crisis” (Kastor, William Clark's World). Further, Kastor and François Weil have argued that Brazer articulated the way the majority of Americans would eventually understand their role in the negotiations surrounding the Purchase. In the present address, Brazer notes that “The acquisition of the vast territory of Louisiana, in itself was a great, a wonderful achievement of wisdom and policy. The means by which it was obtained, afford an honorable, unprecedented example of magnanimity and justice.”

[with]

Smith, Bernard. An Oration Commemorative of the Death of our worthy and distinguished Fellow-Citizen, General George Washington, who Departed this life December 14, 1799; Delivered at Rockaway, on the 22d. of Feb. 1800, A day, set apart, and particularly recommended, by the Executive of the U. States, for that purpose. Morris Town: Printed by Jacob Mann, 1800. 8vo, 12 pp., inscription at title-page “the author” [i.e. Bernard Smith].

A native of New Jersey, Bernard Smith (1776–1835) served as a postmaster of New Brunswick (1810–19); federal surveyor and revenue inspector in New Brunswick (1812–19), as well as a member of the U. S. House of Representatives (1819–21). In 1821, President James Monroe appointed Smith register of the land office for Arkansas Territory—a post Smith held until his death. He also served as secretary to the territorial governor (1825–28), and as a subagent to the Quapaw people.

[with]

Bond, Thomas. An Oration Delivered at Hallowell, the Fifth Day of July, 1802 … In Celebration of the Anniversary of American Independence. Augusta, Maine: Peter Edes, 1802. 8vo, 23 pp.

[with]

Ripley, E. W. An Oration Pronounced at Hallowell, on the Fourth of July, 1805, in Commemoration of American Independence. Portland, Maine: From the Argus Press, by N. Willis, 1805. 8vo, 12 pp.

[with]

M’Keen, Joseph. The Inaugural Address, Delivered in Brunswick, September 9th, 1802…at his Entrance on the Duties of President of Bowdoin College. With an Eulogy, Pronounced at his Funeral, by the Reverand William Jenks. Portland: Printed by Thomas B. Wait & Co., 1807. 8vo, 38 pp., inscription at title-page, “C. Hale[?]”

[with]

Dana, Samuel. An Oration, Pronounced at Groton, in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, on the Fourth of July, A.D. 1807, in Commemoration of the Independence of the United States of America…. Amherst, NH: Printed by Joseph Cushing, 1807. 8vo, 20 pp.

[with]

Lincoln, Daniel Waldo. An Oration, Pronounced at Boston, on the Fourth Day of July, 1810, Before the “Bunker-Hill Association” and in Presence of the Supreme Executive of the Commonwealth. Boston: Printed for Isaac Munroe, 1810. 8vo, 20 pp.

A very appealing, intact sammelband, associated with an important figure of the Revolutionary and Federal periods.

REFERENCES: Kastor, Peter J. William Clark's World: Describing America in an Age of Unknowns (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press) p. 83; Peter J. Kastor, François Weil, editors. Empires of the Imagination: Transatlantic Histories of the Louisiana Purchase (Charlottesville, VA: University of Virginia Press, 2009), p. 19; Looney, J. Jefferson, editor. The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, Retirement Series, Vol. 3 (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2006), p. 511; "Joseph F. Wingate," Biographical Directory of the United States Congress at bioguideretro.congress.gov; Henry Dearborn at britannica.com; The First Generation of United States Marshals at usmarshals.gov

CONDITION: Light to moderate foxing throughout, some pamphlets quite clean; binding good.

Item #5785

Price: $2,750.00

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