Item #8104 The Travellers Guide A New and Correct Map of the United States, Including Great Portions of Missouri Territory, Upper & Lower Canada, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, The Floridas, Spanish Provinces &c. Collected and Compiled From the Most Undoubted Authorities. Samuel Lewis.

Sign up to receive email notices of recent acquisitions.

The Travellers Guide A New and Correct Map of the United States, Including Great Portions of Missouri Territory, Upper & Lower Canada, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, The Floridas, Spanish Provinces &c. Collected and Compiled From the Most Undoubted Authorities.

Philadelphia: Published, Printed and Coloured by Henry Charles, 1819. Hand-colored engraving, 30” x 41.5” plus margins, mounted on new linen and attached to original wooden rods; color retouched. CONDITION: Very good, light stains and toning consistent with age, some creasing (now flattened), a few cracks in margins (now stabilized), restoration to a few small losses in margins.

A handsome example of the first edition of the third of Samuel Lewis’s three wall maps of the United States. It is one of the earliest large-scale maps to incorporate information from the Lewis & Clark map published in 1814—a map to which Samuel Lewis himself was intimately connected, as it was based on his redrawing of William Clark’s manuscript map of 1809. Rumsey notes the probable influence of Melish, as well, and calls it “an outstanding map with much of interest in Missouri Territory.”

Lewis’s map is richly detailed and shows the country as far west as the 110th meridian. A multitude of roads are shown east of the Mississippi, at least superficially making this a “Travellers Guide,” although it would seem more so in title than in practical application. Appearing just above the title and lending a certain charm to the map is an engraved image of a traveler and his dog making their way across a field. Shown in the south is the newly formed Alabama Territory, a status it held for just a few years, from 1817 to 1819, before it became a state. In the north, the regions of present day Wisconsin and a portion of present day Minnesota are designated “North Western Territory,” an essentially semantic vestige of the old Northwest Territory, which ended in 1803 and much of which had by this time become the states of Ohio (1803), Indiana (1816), and Illinois (1818). Wisconsin was actually part of Michigan Territory in 1819. Lewis seems to be following Melish here, who identifies the region similarly, as “Northwest Territory.” Oddly, Lewis has not identified Michigan as a territory, which did not become a state until 1837. Of particular interest is the representation of the Upper Missouri and its numerous tributaries as far west as Rapid Creek, deriving from Lewis & Clark. Curiously, the northern boundary is roughly located along parallel 47.5, following a long section of the Missouri, well south of the “Supposed Northern Boundary of Louisiana.” Lewis has identified the region in between as “Territory Claimed by His Catholic Majesty & Great Britain.” Also of interest are several curious mountain ranges running from east to west, extending across central Missouri Territory and apparently relating to the Rockies. Finally, directly to the west of Louisiana, Texas is identified, although not defined, apart from the boundary line along the Red River. The rest of Mexico is simply described as “Spanish Province.”

Samuel Lewis (ca. 1754–1822), whose place of birth is unknown, was a Philadelphia mapmaker, geographer, publisher, draughtsman, and a drawing and writing master. His first maps were compiled for Matthew Carey’s American Atlas of 1795, the first such atlas published in the United States, which accompanied an edition of Guthrie’s Geography. Subsequently, Lewis formed a partnership with British map publisher Aaron Arrowsmith. Their New and Elegant General Atlas appeared in 1804. The American maps were all drawn by Lewis. The first of Lewis’s wall maps, A Correct Map of the United States With the West Indies, was published in 1813; his second, A New and Accurate Map of the United States of North America appeared in 1816; and the present Travellers Guide in 1819. Lewis’s greatest claim to fame, however, is his contribution to A Map of Lewis and Clark’s Track Across the Western Portion of North America From the Mississippi to the Pacific Ocean, a landmark of American cartography, which appeared in some copies of the official History of the Expedition (Philadelphia, 1814). 

REFERENCES: Streeter 3804; Rumsey 2482; Wheat, Tansmisissippi West, 332; Ristow, American Maps and Mapmakers, pp. 265–66; Brown, Ralph. “The American Geographies of Jedediah Morse,” Annals of the Association of American Geographers 31 (1941), pp. 187–88.

Item #8104

On Hold

Price: $9,500.00

See all items in Maps
See all items by