Item #8473 Black Power : SNCC Speaks for Itself : A Collection of Interviews and Statements. Stokeley Carmichael, et. al.
Black Power : SNCC Speaks for Itself : A Collection of Interviews and Statements.

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Carmichael, Stokeley, et. al.

Black Power : SNCC Speaks for Itself : A Collection of Interviews and Statements.

Ann Arbor, Michigan: The Radical Education Project, [ca. 1967]. Booklet, 11” x 8.5”, illustrated yellow wrappers, staple binding. 9 pp. CONDITION: Very good-, slight soiling and .25” tear to upper wrapper, final leaf detached at one staple; no lower wrapper, though unclear if it originally had one.

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) formed in 1960 in the wake of a series of lunch counter and university sit-ins, and quickly rose to prominence, with an early acknowledgement from Martin Luther King, Jr., who stated that: “What is new in your fight is the fact that it was initiated, fed, and sustained by students.” During the 1960s “there were more SNCC field secretaries working full time in southern communities than any civil rights organization before or since” (Cobb). The organization partnered briefly with the Black Panthers 

This collection of statements and interviews opens with a discussion of “The Basis of Black Power,” introduced with a touch of irony as “A working paper prepared by members of SNCC in Winter 1965–66,” which, “according to the NY Times of 5 August 1966, from which this is taken,…serves as the basis for SNCC’s ‘black power’ philosophy.” What follows are statements by Stokely Carmichael and his successor as Chairman of the SNCC, H. Rap Brown (whose statement was made “minutes before he was arrested in the Washington, D.C. airport on 26 July, 1967”), and an interview with Brown, which was originally published in July, 1967.

The Radical Education Project was founded in Ann Arbor, Michigan by activists from Students for a Democratic Society, and operated from 1966 into the early 1970s. It published works on women’s liberation, capitalism, class conflict, imperialism, and the Third World with the goal of strengthening “the movement toward a new left in America” (Radical Education Project”).

REFERENCES: Cobb, Charlie. “The Story of SNCC,” Digital SNCC Gateway online; “Radical Education Project publications, 1961-1969,” University of Michigan Library online.

Item #8473

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