Item #8816 The Mob Still Rides : A Review of the Lynching Record, 1931-1935.
The Mob Still Rides : A Review of the Lynching Record, 1931-1935.
The Mob Still Rides : A Review of the Lynching Record, 1931-1935.
The Mob Still Rides : A Review of the Lynching Record, 1931-1935.

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The Mob Still Rides : A Review of the Lynching Record, 1931-1935.

Atlanta: Commission on Interracial Cooperation, [1936]. Pamphlet, 8vo (8.75” x 5.875”), original blue printed wrappers. 24 pp. CONDITION: Very good, light wear and spotting to wrappers, which are beginning to separate from rusted staple binding; contents very good+.

A report on five years of lynchings, compiled by “the major race reform organization in the South during the period between the world wars” (Sistrom).

Stated second edition of this report on lynching and mob violence, compiled by the founding branch of the Commission on Interracial Cooperation. (The first was printed four months earlier, in March of 1936). Five years after the publication of an extensive study compiled by the organization’s research director, Dr. Arthur F. Raper, on “The Tragedy of Lynching,” the “lynching habit”—as the foreword calls it—“seems as strongly entrenched as it was in 1930.” The purpose of this volume is to summarize “the eighty-four lynchings of the past five years,” and in doing so “bring the facts into the limelight and keep them there” in hopes of bringing about a “fundamental remedy.” The findings are graphed on page 4, prior to discussions of “Geographic and Racial Factors,” “Why Lynchers Go Unpunished,” the “High Cost of Lynch-Bent Mobs,” the need for “Factual Newspaper Reports,” “Lynching and Racial Exploitation,” and more.

The Commission on Interracial Cooperation was founded in Atlanta in 1919, and soon established branches in all former Confederate states, as well as several others (Sistrom). Inspired in large part by whites’ more widespread recognition of racial inequality and Black merit following the contribution of African Americans to the first World War, the organization helped pave the way for more substantial reforms in race relations, although it would remain a predominantly white organization. The Commission was replaced in 1944 by the Southern Regional Council.

REFERENCES: Sistrom, Michael. “Bridging the Gap: The Commission on Interracial Cooperation,” Documenting the American South online.

Item #8816

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