Item #8834 [Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]. William Henry Greenwood N. Finegan, William E. Merrill, William C. Margedant.
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]
[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]

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[Atlas of maps from and of the Western Theater of the Civil War.]

Charleston, SC; Chattanooga, TN; various locations in Georgia; and elsewhere, 1861-1865. 32 printed and manuscript maps, sizes from 6” x 8” to 20” x 25 ”. Each backed with linen and bound into a large binder of black morocco over cloth with title in gilt on spine and front board. See below for an item-level inventory of the maps.

An extraordinary atlas factice of maps assembled by Medal of Honor winner Joseph A. Sladen (1841-1911) during his service in the Chattanooga and Atlanta Campaigns and the subsequent “March to the Sea.” The vast majority of the maps are extremely rare or even unique, and such a gathering would be impossible to reproduce. Offered in partnership with Boston Rare Maps of Southampton, Massachusetts.

The atlas includes coverage for three of the most memorable campaigns in the Western Theater of the Civil War: the Chattanooga Campaign, the Atlanta Campaign, and Sherman’s “March to the Sea” from Atlanta to Savannah. It includes 31 maps (not counting a map of Prussia and Baden, clearly out of place), being a mix of large-scale printed and manuscript reconnaissance maps, primarily relating to the Atlanta campaign; printed “theater” maps of substantial areas of Tennessee, Georgia, South Carolina and North Carolina; and an almost unobtainably rare map of Atlanta printed on cloth. With few exceptions, all of the maps were produced in 1864 for use in planning the strategic and/or tactical elements of the campaigns. 

Joseph A. Sladen

Born in Rochdale, England, Sladen emigrated to Lowell, Massachusetts at the age of five. At the age of nine[!] the family’s finances drove him to work in the city’s mills while attending school sporadically. In 1862 he enlisted in the Massachusetts 33rd Infantry, seeing action at Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. Around the time of the Battle of Gettysburg he was detached to the staff of Oliver Otis Howard, commander of XI Corps, the beginning of a decades-long professional relationship. In the Fall of 1863 the XI Corps, and Sladen with it, was transferred to the Army of the Cumberland in Tennessee, under overall command of Joseph Hooker, where it participated in the assault on Missionary Ridge and subsequent capture of Chattanooga.

In 1864 Sladen was commissioned as a Lieutenant and accompanied Howard after the latter was given command of IV Corps for the Atlanta Campaign. At the Battle of Resaca (May 13-15, 1864) Sladen and fellow staff officers left their headquarters post to enter the fighting as part of the Union front was collapsing, successfully rallying the troops. For this action he was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor in 1895 (The citation: “While detailed as clerk at headquarters, voluntarily engaged in action at a critical moment and personal example inspired the troops to repel the enemy.”)

Sladen remained on Howard’s staff for the rest of the war. On July 27, 1864, after Maj. General James McPherson was killed at the Battle of Atlanta, Howard was given command of McPherson’s Army of the Tennessee. Subsequently Howard, still in command of the Army of the Tennessee and with Sladen on his staff, led the right wing of General Sherman’s March to the Sea, culminating in the taking of Savannah on December 21, 1864.

Sladen remained in the Army after the war and continued serving under Howard, who from 1865-1874 headed the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands (the “Freedman’s Bureau”), an important agency in the Reconstruction effort. In 1867 Howard played a leading role in founding Howard University in Washington and became its first President. The University was primarily geared toward African-American students, but Sladen, still on Gen. Howard’s staff, took advantage of its proximity to study medicine there, earning his M.D. in 1871 or 1872.

In the summer of 1872 Sladen accompanied Howard on a mission to negotiate a settlement with Apache leader Cochise, during which he kept a journal, later published as Making Peace with Cochise (University of Oklahoma Press, 2008). He continued on Howard’s staff through 1885, and was then transferred to Fort Vancouver, Washington State. After their parting, Howard wrote to Sladen that he would remember their “marches, battles, inspections, day and night toilings, helpfulness in trouble, sympathy in pain, joy in triumph, chagrin at false friends, and loyal service to the country…so much that my heart swells as I think that I am growing old and need you still so much.” (Robinson, p. 9)

Sladen left the Army in 1889 and moved with his family to Portland, Oregon. There he worked in the insurance business for a few years, and then in 1894 was appointed Clerk of the U.S. Circuit Court, District of Oregon. He held this position until his retirement until 1908 or so. He must have done well financially, as he and his wife Martha had a beautiful home built for themselves at NW 22nd and Flanders by the prominent architectural firm Whidden and Lewis. He remained active in the Scottish Rite Masons and community organizations until his death by heart attack in early 1911.

The atlas

Offered here is an extraordinary atlas factice of maps accumulated by Sladen during his service on Howard’s staff. We believe the atlas was compiled posthumously, at the behest of his son Major General Fred Winchester Sladen (1867-1945), perhaps during his service from 1922-1926 as 32nd Superintendent of the United States Military Academy.

The atlas consists of thirty-two manuscript and printed maps, each backed with linen, ranging in size from roughly 6” x 8” to 20” x 25 ”. With the strange exception of a Colton map of The Western Provinces of Prussia & Baden, all the maps depict subjects in Tennessee, Georgia, South Carolina, and or North Carolina.  As mentioned above, they are a mix of large-scale printed and manuscript reconnaissance maps, primarily relating to the Atlanta campaign; smaller-scale printed “theater” maps of substantial areas of Tennessee, Georgia, South Carolina and/or North Carolina; and an almost unobtainably rare map of Atlanta printed on cloth. Almost all were produced in 1864 for use in planning the strategic and/or tactical elements of the campaigns.

We address each of these categories in turn, and this essay then ends with an itemized list of the contents of the atlas.

Printed reconnaissance maps

Eleven printed reconnaissance maps form one of the largest groups of the collection. Generally rendered at a scale of 1-2” to the mile, they show railroads, roads and trails, bodies of water, major topographical features (with elevations indicated by hachuring), and the locations of residences, businesses, churches and public buildings. With the exception of map 10, which covers an area west of Chattanooga, all depict locales associated with the Atlanta campaign.

Of these printed reconnaissance maps, several (maps #6, 12, 15, 16 and 32) are so-called “black maps” of different parts of Cobb County, Georgia. These were printed by a process developed by Captain William C. Margedant of the Topographical Department of the Army of the Cumberland:

Chemically treated paper was placed under tracing paper on which a map was drawn in heavy black ink. In the sun, the treated paper stayed white under the black ink, while the rest of the treated paper blackened from the sunlight. The resulting black maps, as they were called, had white rivers and roads… Updates could quickly be made on the tracing paper, and new black maps reflecting the latest information could be rapidly prepared and distributed. (McElfresh, p. 71)

Also of note in this group are two copies (maps # 20 and 28) of Map of 1st Distrt. Campbell Co. Georgia, South of the Cherokee Boundy. Line. These depict an area southwest of Atlanta, and are remarkable for being lithographically printed on cloth “in the field” at Chattanooga, the cloth offering both durability and portability. These maps bear Margedant’s name, evidently reflecting his role in overseeing their printing at the Topographical Office of the Army of the Cumberland. 

Of greater interest, still, are the names of William E. Merrill, Chief Topographical Engineer of the Department of the Cumberland (1837-1891, West Point Class of 1859), and that of one “Sergeant Finegan.” From Fall 1863 on, Merrill oversaw the mapmaking program of the Army of the Cumberland, and is described by McElfresh as “perhaps the most innovative and conscientious exponent of mapping during the Civil War” (p. 244). Merrill developed a sophisticated, highly-productive, and mobile intelligence and mapmaking operation, capable of synthesizing information from existing government and commercial maps, Union reconnaissance efforts, and information from local informants. A key member of this operation was Sergeant N. Finegan, who apparently had a gift for interrogation, and whose name appears on three of the maps in this atlas. Indeed, “so valuable was the intelligence he gleaned that the preparation of maps for General William Tecumseh Sherman’s campaign from Chattanooga to Atlanta was delayed while Finegan finished questioning his spies, scouts, refugees, travelers, prisoners, preachers, and peddlers—his “motley crew,” in Merrill’s words.” (McElfresh, p. 51)

Manuscript reconnaissance maps

Thirteen manuscript reconnaissance maps form the largest category of maps in the atlas. They are rendered at a scale of 1”-4” to the mile, using a mix of ink, pencil and colored pencil. Like the printed reconnaissance maps, they generally  show railroads, roads and trails, bodies of water, major topographical features (with elevations indicated by hachuring), and the locations of residences, businesses, churches and public buildings. They are more likely to indicate wooded areas (usually in green pencil), and several also show the positions of headquarters, individual units, artillery positions and/or fortifications.

At least five of the maps (maps #5, 6, 17, 19 and 22) are signed, or in the hand of, “W. H. Greenwood Capt. and A.D.C.” Captain Greenwood served as an aide-de-camp to General David S. Stanley, who commanded first the 1st Division and then the IV Corps of the Army of the Cumberland during the Atlanta campaign. At Greenwood’s death in or around 1881, Stanley wrote a long and lavish tribute, including:

Soon after the Battle of Stone River, General Rosecrans made inquiry for competent engineer officers to organize a topographical service, and Greenwood was selected for this duty and for better facilities for seeing the country, he was directed to report to General Stanley at that time Chief of Cavalry for the Army of the Cumberland. The relation thus established continued to the end of the war, Colonel Greenwood remaining a part of this commander’s military family until the muster-out of the 4th Corps of the Army of the Cumberland in the fall of 1865. To recount Colonel Greenwood’s services would necessitate a recital of the experiences of the Army of the Cumberland itself. Comparisons are sometimes in bad taste, but, knowing of what he speaks, the writer can truly say that no officer serviced in the Army of the Cumberland who was present at and participated in more battles, actions, affairs, skirmishes than Colonel Greenwood. Always strong and well, though of slender form, he was always for duty, day and night. (General David S. Stanley, “William Henry Greenwood”, for the Society of Civil Engineers, 1881)

The “of-the-moment” immediacy of Greenwood’s reconnaissance maps, presumably for use of Stanley and other senior officers of the 1st Division and/or IV Corps, provide an interesting counterpoint to the more finished printed maps produced by the Topographical Engineers Office of the Army of the Cumberland.

Printed theater maps

Six maps in the atlas are smaller-scale productions covering large areas of the theater in which Sherman’s Army was operating. One of these (map #26) is the only Confederate-imprint map in the atlas being Map of the Seat of War in South Carolina, and Georgia, published back in 1861 by the Charleston, South Carolina partnership of Evans and Cogswell. It’s tempting to think that this was captured from a Confederate officer during the war and used by General Howard and his staff, though of course it may have been acquired after the fall of the Confederacy. 

Also of great interest are two copies (maps #8 and 30) of Part of Northern Georgia. Compiled under the Direction of Capt. Wm. E Merrill, Chief Top’l Eng’r D. C., printed at Chattanooga (one on muslin for use by cavalry) to support the first phase of the Atlanta campaign. We have written above about Merrill and the excellence of the Army of the Cumberland’s Topographic Office, though McElfresh’s assessment of the map is equivocal:

This is one of the Civil War’s most famous maps…. It was not, in spite of all the resources applied, a terribly accurate map. To a field officer such as General Jacob D. Cox, it was exasperatingly inaccurate, but it was better than anything the Confederates had: it depicted Snake Creek Gap, a feature the Confederates were ignorant of, and it was a better map than any other Union command ever carried into a campaign. (p. 174)

Map #27 is a very large extract copied from a later (1850s?) edition of William Bonner’s map of the state, the extract extending roughly from the latitude of Savannah north to that of Atlanta. Presumably this was prepared in advance of the “March to the Sea”. It contains no specifically military information, but is interesting as evidence of just how few published maps of the region the Union Army had at its disposal.

Atlanta… From Vincent’s Subdivision Map

From a collector’s perspective, map #24 is arguably the pick of the litter. It is the first map of Atlanta a collector can reasonably hope to obtain over the course of a lifetime, based on an unobtainable map published in Savannah in the 1850s. Per McElfresh, 

it was printed and distributed as the Union armies began to reach to the outer limits of Atlanta, providing valuable information, especially to the artillery, as lines were laid out and troops and guns were deployed to besiege and bombard the defended town. Maps like this were confiscated from the residences of county surveyors, from county courthouses, and from local civil engineers (p. 189)

Not only does the map depict the city’s layout in detail, but an index at the base identifies no fewer than 26 rail facilities, warehouses, businesses, churches, and schools.

List of maps

The following list describes the 32 maps in the sequence they are presented in the atlas.

 

1.     [Untitled manuscript map of area between Ackworth and Marietta, Georgia.] Ms in pencil and colored pencil on lined paper, 9 ”h x 11 3/8”w at sheet edge. Some loss at one fold intersection. Silked. Reconnaissance map-ms.

2.     [Untitled manuscript map of rail lines and roads between Raleigh and Kinston, North Carolina.] NP, ND. Ms in ink and watercolor on lined paper, 7 ”h x 9 3/8”w at sheet edge. Silked. Reconnaissance map-ms.

3.     [Untitled manuscript map of area north and east of Dallas, Georgia.] NP, ND. Scale 1”:mile. Ms in pencil and colored pencil on lined paper, 9 ”h x 11 ”w at sheet edge. Some losses. Silked. Reconnaissance map-ms.

4.     Information Map 20th Army Corps [manuscript map depicting area north and west of Marietta, Georgia.] NP: June 22, 1864. Scale 1”:mile. Ms in pencil and colored pencil, 5 ”h x 8”w at sheet edge. Minor edge chips. Silked. Reconnaissance map-ms.

5.     W. H. Greenwood Capt. And A.D.C., [Untitled manuscript map of area west of Chattahoochee River from Vining’s Station north to Marietta Road.] Ms in ink and colored pencil, 13 ”h x 11 3/8”w at sheet edge plus flap at left. Silked. Reconnaissance map-ms.

6.     Printed at Head Quarters Dept. Cumb[erland], [Untitled map of area east and west of Connasauga River, Georgia, from south of Calhoun to north of Tilton.] NP, May 13 1864. Photo-reproduction, 16 ”h x 10 ”w at sheet edge. Reconnaissance map-printed.

7.     Map Showing Route of Marches of the Army of Genl. W.T. Sherman from Atlanta, GA to Goldsboro, N.C. To accompany the report of operations from Savannah, GA. To Goldsboro, N.C. Engineer Bureau, War Department,[1865]. Lithograph, 10”h x 16”w at neat line, outline color to show routes of Shermans’ various corps. Stephenson 90, S7. Theater map.

8.     Part of Northern Georgia. Compiled under the Direction of Capt. Wm. E Merrill, Chief Top’l Eng’r D. C…. Official Issue. Wm. C. Margedant Capt. & Supt. Topl. Eng’r Office, D. C. Printed in the Field, Chattanooga, Tenn. May 5th1864. Lithograph on muslin or silk, 19 ”h x 13”w at neat line, some outline color to roads. Wrinkled, trimmed into neat line at left with minor loss, some soiling and staining. Couple of faint annotations in pencil. McElfresh, p. 174. Stephenson S31. Theater map.

9.     Compiled under the Direction of Capt. Wm. E. Merrill, U.S. Engineers. Chief Engineer, Army of the Cumberland, [Untitled map of area between Rossville and La Fayette, Georgia on the east and the Lookout Mountains on the west.]Lith at Head Qs, Stevenson, AL, Aug. 28, 1863. Scale 1”:mile. Lithograph, 18 ”h x 12 ”w at neat line, spot color to Trenton R.R. Some chips at edges. Not in Stephenson? Reconnaissance map-printed.

10.  Compiled… under the Direction of Capt. Wm. E. Merrill, Corps of Engineers, [Untitled map of a roughly 18 1/2 by 13-mile area north of Tennessee River, centered very roughly on Jasper, Tennessee.] Lith. in camp near Stevenson, AL, Aug., 1863. Scale 1”:mile. Lithograph, 18 ”h x 12 ”w at neat line, spot color to Trenton R.R. Some chips at edges. Stephenson 426.1. Reconnaissance map-printed.

11.  [Untitled manuscript map of area north of Etowah River between Rome and Kingston, Georgia.] Hd qrs 17th Army Corps at Skinners House, ND. Ms in pencil, ink and watercolor, 7 ”h x 9 ”w at sheet edge. Reconnaissance map-ms.

12.  Part of Cobb Co. GA. Compiled from Surveys & Information made by the Top. Eng. D. C. Printed at the Top. Eng. Office D.C. in the field. Morris Hill Church June 8th [1864]. Photo-reproduction in the field, ca. 13 ”h x 12”w, spot color to a couple of roads. Trimmed along left edge, with loss to a few letters in title. Not in Stephenson. Reconnaissance map-printed.

13.  Bet. Lost Mt & Kenesaw Before turning left. NP, ND. Ms in pencil, 9 ” x 7 ” at sheet edge. Silked. Reconnaissance-ms.

14.  [Prob, W.H. Greenwood], surrounding west-end of Little Kensaw [crossed-out:] First works Beyond Marietta. NP, ND [but prob. July 1864]. Ms. In ink and colored pencil, 10 ”h x 10 ”w at sheet edge. Silked. Reconnaissance map-ms.

15.  Part of Cobb Co. GA. Compiled & Printed at the Top. Eng. Office D.C. in the field Big Shanty, June 12th 1864. [with an added flap at left:] Additions & Corrections to the Map of Cobb Co., Ga. Printed at the Top. Engr. Office D. C. in the field June 10th 1864. Scale 1”: mile. Photoreproduction in the field, 12 ”h x 19”w at neat line, plus 7” x 4 ” flap at left. Spot color. Stephenson S60. Reconnaissance map-printed.

16.  Part of Cobb County Georgia from Surveys made by the Top. Engrs. of the Dept. of the Cumb. Topl. Engrs. Of the Dept. and Army of the Tenn. Topl. Engrs. Of the 23rd Army Corps. Printed at Topographical Engr. Office Headquarters Department of the Cumberland June 26th 1864. Compiled by Sergt. N. Finegan Draughtsman. Official Issue H. C. Wharton Lt. Engrs. Photoreproduction in the field, 13”h x 13 ”w plus margins. Trimmed at lower left with no loss to cartography. Stephenson S61. Reconnaissance map-printed.

17.  Survey by W.H. Greenwood Capt and A.D.C., [Untitled manuscript map of route from Buckhead to Peach Tree Court House and South Fork Peach Tree Creek.] NP, ND. Scale 4”:mile. Ms in ink and colored pencil, 6 3/8”h x 17”w at sheet edge. Some chipping to upper edge. Silked. Reconnaissance map-ms.

18.  Thos. [W.L.?] Remington, Maj. & Top. Eng 2nd Div 4th A.C., [Untitled manuscript map of 4th Army Corps positions in an area south of Buckhead.] NP, ND. Scale 4”:mile. Ms in pencil and colored pencil, 10 ”h x 8”w at sheet edge. Reconnaissance map-ms.

19.  By W.H. Greenwood Capt and A.D.C., [Untitled manuscript map of an undetermined location, showing positions of units under Lieut. General David S. Stanley.] NP, ND [but prob. on or just after July 23, 1864]. Scale 4”:mile. Ms in ink, pencil and colored pencil, 9 ”h x 10 5/8”w at sheet edge. Silked. Reconnaissance map-ms.

20.  Map of 1st Distrt. Campbell Co. Georgia, South of the Cherokee Boundy. Line. Compiled under direction of Capt. W.E. Merrill, Chief Topl. Engr. D.C., by Sergt. Finegan, from the notes of a captured Rebel Engineer & State map (south of the Chattahoochee Riv)… Official Issue. Wm. C. Margedant Capt. & Supt. Topl. Engr. Office D.C. Autographed & printed in the field, Chattanooga May 23rd 1864. Scale 2”:mile. Printed on linen, 17 ”h x 20 ”w at neat line. Lower-left margin trimmed to neat line. Not in Stephenson (but held by Library of Congress). Same as map 28. Reconnaissance map-printed.

21.  Map of part of Fulton, Fayette, and Campbell Counties from Surveys, State Map and Information. Extra copies to be filled up and returned for Second Edition. Topl Engr Office, Army of the Cumbd. NP, ND. Scale slightly less than 1”:mile. Lithograph, 21 ”h x 18 ”w at neat line. With two flaps passed on to update the map. Lower-left margin trimmed to neat line. Stephenson S26. Reconnaissance map-printed.

22.  W.H. Greenwood Capt and A.D.C., [Untitled manuscript map of an undetermined area along both banks of the Chattahoochee, west of Atlanta, “Copy for Maj Gen D. S. Stanly”.] NP, ND. Ms in ink, pencil and colored pencil, irregular in shape (prob. due to trimming) but 13”h x 23 ”w at greatest extent. Some losses along fold intersections. Silked. Reconnaissance map-ms.

23.  Part of Cobb and Fulton Counties Georgia Compiled from Land Maps & Information at Topogr. Engr. Office Army of the Cumberland Marietta Ga. July 7th 1864…. Drawn and Printed at Topl. Engr. Office Army of the Cumb. Marietta Georgia. Scale slightly less than 1”:mile. Lithograph, 17 5/8”h x 11 ”w at neat line. Chip to left margin. Not in Stephenson. Reconnaissance map-printed.

24.  Atlanta…. From Vincent’s Subdivision Map, published by the City Council…. Drawn and printed at Topl. Engr. Office, HdQrs. A.C., in the field. July 25th. 1864. Printed on linen, 14 ”h x 10”w at neat line. McElresh, p. 189. Stephenson S44. Atlanta map.

25.  [Untitled sketch map of the area around Pocataligo, Georgia.] NP, ND. Ms in ink on lined paper, 11 ”h x 8”w at sheet edge. Reconnaissance map-ms.

26.  Map of the Seat of War in South Carolina, and Georgia. Published & Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell, 3. Broad St., Charleston, S. C. [1861]. Scale ca. 1”:5 miles. Lithograph, 20 1/8”h x 25 ”w at neat line. Stephenson 359. Theater map.

27.  Part of the State Map of Georgia Traced from Original at the Engr. Office Dept. & A. of the Tenn. Ms in ink and watercolor on silk[?], 21 ”h x 34 ”w at sheet edge. Copied from a later (1850s?) edition of William Bonner’s map of the state, the extract extending roughly from the latitude of Savannah north to that of Atlanta. Theater map.

28.  Map of 1st. Distrt. Campbell Co. Georgia, South of the Cherokee Boundy. Line. Compiled uder Direction of Capt. W. E. Merrill, Chief Topl. Engr. D.C., by Sergt. Finegan, from the notes of a captured Rebel Engineer & State map (south of the Chattahoochee Riv.)… Official Issue. Wm. C. Margedant Capt. & Supt. Topl. Engr. Office D.C. Autographed & printed in the field. Chattanooga May 23d. 1864. Lithograph on cloth, 18”h x 20 ”w at neat line. McElfresh, p. 176. Not in Stephenson (but held by LC). Same as map 20. Reconnaissance map-printed.

29.  39th Cong. 1st Sess. Report of the Chief Engineer USA…. Map Illustrating the Siege of Atlanta, GA. By the U.S. Forces under Command of Maj. Gen. W. T. Sherman from the passage of Peach Tree Creek, July 19th 1864 to the commencement of the movement upon the Enemy’s lines of communication south of Atlanta, August 26, 1864…. Edw. Molitor Lith…. Bowen & Co. lith. Philada. Scale 4”:3 miles. Lithograph, 11 ”h x 21”w, printed outline color. Stephenson 137, S39. Theater map.

30.  Part of Northern Georgia. Compiled under the Direction of Capt. Wm. E Merrill, Chief Top’l Eng’r D. C…. Official Issue. Wm. C. Margedant Capt. & Supt. Topl. Eng’r Office, D. C. Printed in the Field, Chattanooga, Tenn. May 5th1864. Lithograph on muslin or silk, 20 ”h x 13 ”w at neat line, some outline color to roads an rivers. Wrinkled, trimmed into neat line at left with minor loss, some soiling and staining. Inscribed by or to General Howard in lower margin. McElfresh, p. 174. Stephenson S31. Same as map 8. Theater map.

31.  The Western Provinces of Prussia & Baden…. Compiled, Printed and Published by G.W. & C.B. Colton & Co. No. 172 William St. New York. Rufus Blanchard, Chicago, Ill. 

32.  Part of Cobb Co. GA. Compiled & Printed at the Top. Eng. Office D.C. in the field Big Shanty, June 12th 1864. [with an added flap at left:] Additions & Corrections to the Map of Cobb Co., Ga. Printed at the Top. Engr. Office D. C. in the field June 10th 1864. Scale 1”: mile. Photoreproduction in the field, 12 ”h x 19”w at neat line, plus 7” x 4 ” flap at left. Spot color. Stephenson S60. Same as map 15. Reconnaissance map-printed.

For its sheer volume of rare and unique maps, many of them of the highest quality and/or significance, we believe this to be the finest gathering of Civil War cartographic material to appear on the market in many years.

Provenance and references

Descended until recently in the Sladen family. Acquired by us at a major sale of the Sladen family archive held at Poulin Antiques and Auctions (Fairfield, ME) in November 2023.

Earl B. McElfresh, Maps and Mapmakers of the Civil War (dNew York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 1999). Richard W. Stephenson, Civil War Maps (Washington: Library of Congress, 1989). Biograpahical information on Sladen primarily from Worshipful Br. Commander Michael Robinson, “Joseph Alton Sladen Story”, online on the web site of the Oregon Scottish Rite (accessed Dec. 2023), with reference also to the Wikipedia entries for Sladen and General Oliver Otis Howard.

Item #8834

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