A Journal; Containing an Account of the Wrongs, Sufferings, and Neglect, Experienced by Americans in France. By Stephen Clubb, late a prisoner in that empire. Stephen Clubb.
A Journal; Containing an Account of the Wrongs, Sufferings, and Neglect, Experienced by Americans in France. By Stephen Clubb, late a prisoner in that empire.
A Journal; Containing an Account of the Wrongs, Sufferings, and Neglect, Experienced by Americans in France. By Stephen Clubb, late a prisoner in that empire.

A Journal; Containing an Account of the Wrongs, Sufferings, and Neglect, Experienced by Americans in France. By Stephen Clubb, late a prisoner in that empire.

Boston, 1809. 8vo (8.25” x 5.5”), lacking wrappers. 60 pp.

The personal narrative of a British-American sailor who was wrongfully arrested and imprisoned by the French during the ongoing Peninsular War.

Stephen Clubb—born in England and not yet a naturalized citizen of the U.S.—was serving as second mate on the American ship Hyades when he was arrested by the French in January 1808. Clubb was married to an American woman and on his way to settle in the U.S. He and his wife had embarked on the ship Triton bound for Baltimore; however, when the ship was forced into the Isle of Wight the couple had to seek another passage via the ship Hyades. When Hyades was captured by the French, Clubb revealed himself an Englishman and pilot of the ship and was subsequently arrested, despite American neutrality. As he spells out here, his unlawful detention was in direct opposition to an 1809 treaty in place between France and the U.S.

Based on his prison diary, Clubb’s narrative covers the period from December 1807 to June 1809. Included are interesting descriptions of his travel as a prisoner; visits from his wife; comments on the French people; teaching English in prison, and so forth. Ultimately, Clubb’s friend, a Mr. Pigault, presents his case to Napoleon himself—following which he is liberated and he and his wife are each granted passports. The title-page states the work was “Published at the particular request of a number of citizens of the U.S., who were in confinement, and treated as British prisoners of war, when Mr. Clubb left France, which was in the month of July last, he being set at liberty by express order of the emperor.”

REFERENCES: Sabin 13795; Shaw & Shoemaker 17235; American Travelers Abroad C74.

CONDITION: Foxed throughout, last two pages clipped at bottom-right corner, no losses to the text.

Item #5544

Price: $350.00

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