Map of the Town of Danvers Massachusetts. Civil Engineer, Surveyor.
Map of the Town of Danvers Massachusetts.
Map of the Town of Danvers Massachusetts.
Map of the Town of Danvers Massachusetts.
Map of the Town of Danvers Massachusetts.
Map of the Town of Danvers Massachusetts.

Map of the Town of Danvers Massachusetts.

Philadelphia and Boston: Cor. Pine & Perry Stts. Philada., No. 17, Doane St., Boston; Printed by Wagner & McGuigan, Phila., Friend & Aub Lith., 80 Walnut St. Philada.,1852. Lithograph, 32.5” x 25.25”, plus margins, hand-colored in outline; mounted on original linen and attached to wooden rods.

A very scarce map of the historic town of Danvers in Essex County, Mass., situated just north of Salem.

This informative and handsome map shows the town’s streets, buildings, and landowners, as well as rail lines and topography. Seven detailed vignettes of local scenes embellish the margins, including a view of Danversport, residences of notable individuals, the Danvers Alms House, a Church, and a view down Washington Street in South Danvers. The latter embraces residences, monuments, a shoe factory, a store, houses, and an office. At the time this map was published Danvers was a prosperous commercial town, which had benefited greatly when the railroad arrived in the 1840s. Shown on this map are the Essex R.R, the Salem and Lowell R.R. and the South Reading Branch R.R.

Situated some seventeen miles north of Boston and partially bounded by Salem and Beverly, the area of present-day Danvers was known as Salem Village in the seventeenth century, which was the center of the 1692 Salem witchcraft trials. Danvers became independent from Salem in 1752 and was incorporated in 1757—but incorporation was blocked in 1759 due to George II’s disapproval of the incorporation of new townships. In 1775, the district was again incorporated. At the time of the Revolution, Danversport served as a hub for shipping and shipbuilding. In the 1830s, Tapleyville emerged as a center for the production of woven carpets, and Danvers Plains became an important commercial center with the arrival of the railroad in the 1840s. In 1857, part of Beverly was annexed to Danvers.

Little is known about civil engineer and map publisher Henry McIntyre other than that he produced fine maps of Boston, Danvers, Lynn, Marblehead, and Newburyport, Mass., as well as one of Norwich, Connecticut. Antique Map Price Record lists just seven examples of maps by McIntyre offered from 1983 to present.

OCLC records just three copies of the present map, at the Boston Public Library, Salem State University, and the Library of Congress. Another copy is held by the American Antiquarian Society.

REFERENCES: Encyclopædia Britannica, Vol. 7 (1911), Danvers at en.wikisource.org

CONDITION: Very good, silk selvage largely perished, moderate rubbing, streaking, and toning.

Item #5407

Price: $3,500.00

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