Item #7697 Burlington Route. The Burlington Route Runs Daily Through Trains Between Chicago, Peoria, or St. Louis and Denver, Nebraska City, Cheyenne, Kansas City, Omaha, St. Joseph, Council Bluffs, Atchison, Lincoln, St. Paul, Deadwood, Minneapolis, and the Black Hills, Connecting With Through Trains from all Points Northwest, West, and Southwest. Burlington Chicago, Quincy Railroad Co.

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Burlington Route. The Burlington Route Runs Daily Through Trains Between Chicago, Peoria, or St. Louis and Denver, Nebraska City, Cheyenne, Kansas City, Omaha, St. Joseph, Council Bluffs, Atchison, Lincoln, St. Paul, Deadwood, Minneapolis, and the Black Hills, Connecting With Through Trains from all Points Northwest, West, and Southwest.

Chicago: Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad, 1892. Rand McNally and Co. Engravers [i.e., lithographers.]. Chromolithograph, 32.5” x 45”, plus margins, banner title printed above map with two Burlington Route insignias, time zones overprinted on the map in red; backed on new linen, original wooden rods removed. CONDITION: Good, light wear at margins, toning to upper half of top margin, light toning across lower sixth of map, a few light cracks to black banner title.

A large, attractive map highlighting the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad, known as the Burlington Route.

This map presents the entire U. S. rail network, with the Burlington Route (BR) and its spurs shown in black at the center, passing through Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska and other states, and connecting with many other railroads, shown in red, such as the Union Pacific R.R., the Chicago, St. Paul & Omaha R.R., and so forth. The BR ran daily between Chicago, Peoria, and St. Louis, and its stops included Denver, Nebraska City, Cheyenne, Kansas City, Omaha, St. Joseph, Council Bluffs, Atchison, Lincoln, Deadwood, Minneapolis, and the Black Hills. The map extends from westernmost Maine in the east to Vancouver, Canada in the west, and from Manitoba, Canada in the north to a portion of Mexico in the south (to which two rail lines run). Details include cities and towns, state and county boundaries, and the four time zones of Pacific Time, Mountain Time, Central Time, and Eastern Time. As a result of advocacy on the part of railroad companies, the time zones were adopted by both the U.S. and Canada in 1883, enabling railroads to coordinate train schedules across North America, rather than relying on thousands of divergent local times (the dividing lines adopted are very close to the ones presently in use). Three insets illustrations in lower-left corner offer interior views of the Burlington Route’s accommodations: a Pullman palace sleeping car, a passenger chair car, and a dining car. The map was issued by the Passenger Department of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad. As noted at the bottom, copies were available by mail for fifteen cents, courtesy of P. S. Eustis, General Passenger and Ticket Agent of the railroad. 

The Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Co. was founded in 1859 by John M. Forbes, who merged several smaller midwestern railroads. The railroad grew until it extended from the Great Lakes to the Rocky Mountains. In 1901, James J. Hill bought control and sought to combine the railroad with both his Great Northern Railway and J. P. Morgan’s Northern Pacific Railway. However, in 1904 the U.S. Supreme Court, in the Northern Securities case, declared the scheme illegal under the Sherman Anti-Trust Act. In 1970, the railroad merged with the Northern Pacific Railway and the Great Northern Railway to form the Burlington Northern Railroad.

OCLC records only two copies, at the Library of Congress and Pennsylvania State University.

REFERENCES: “Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad Company” at Britannica online; “Railroads create the first time zones” (2009) at History online.

Item #7697

Price: $1,250.00

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