Item #7794 The Santa Fe Tertio-Millennial Anniversary, Character Celebration and Industrial Exposition.
The Santa Fe Tertio-Millennial Anniversary, Character Celebration and Industrial Exposition.
The Santa Fe Tertio-Millennial Anniversary, Character Celebration and Industrial Exposition.

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The Santa Fe Tertio-Millennial Anniversary, Character Celebration and Industrial Exposition.

Santa Fe, 1883. Chromolithographic brochure, 7.5” x 3.5”, in six panels, with illustrated, broadside-like verso. CONDITION: Very good, vertical fold at center of program, 1” tear to margin at upper right horizontal fold of broadside.

An attractive brochure for Santa Fe’s first centennial-style exposition, which was held to boost investment and tourism after the city was bypassed by the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway.

Claiming to mark one third of a millennium since the founding of the city, The Santa Fe Tertio-Millennial Anniversary Character Celebration and Industrial Exposition boasted thirty-three days of pageantry and programming to kickstart a new era of investment and tourism. “Once the thriving terminus of the Santa Fe Trail, later the territorial headquarters of the U.S. Army,” the city had been left off the main line of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway due to difficult terrain, and was anxious to reestablish itself as a center of commerce (Montgomery, p. 94). Although the organizers were well aware that the Spanish settlement of Santa Fe had not been established until 1610—sixty years later than they claimed—the conceit justified the grandeur of the event.

Four panels on the brochure outline the thirty-three day program, which included a “sham fight” as well as numerous dances and games by “Pueblo Indians, from the neighboring pueblos,” “Zuni Indians,” and “the Mescalero and Jicarilla Apaches”; a reenactment of “Spanish chivalry”; a “Grand junta y fiesta in honor of our Mexican visitors from Chihuahua, Durango, Sonora, and other states”; three days of “historic scenes, extending over the period of the Tertio-Millennial…each day to represent a century of history and progress”; and even a bicycle race. On the verso, a broadside-like outline of the festivities illustrated with a chromolithograph of desert flora announces the “Mining and Industrial Exposition” as well as exhibits of “the Natural Resources of the Rocky Mountain Region, in Minerals, Agricultural Products, etc., and the triumphs of Modern Genius and Mechanical Skill,” and a “comprehensive exhibit of Indian and Mexican Relics, Curiosities, and Antiquities.” Visitors were more interested in viewing the cultural exhibitions than investing in the city’s mineral, agricultural, and real-estate potential, however, and the event proved a financial failure. It was not until the 1890s that Native American cultures began to be exploited as a lucrative tourist attraction for the state.

A colorful brochure promoting the first major public exposition in Santa Fe.

REFERENCES: Montgomery, Charles. The Spanish Redemption: Heritage, Power, and Loss on New Mexico’s Upper Rio Grande (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002); Rohr, David. “Santa Fe’s First Exhibition,” El Palacio online.

Item #7794

Price: $675.00

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