Item #7990 City of Boston Public Celebrations Bunker Hill Day 1918 [manuscript title].
City of Boston Public Celebrations Bunker Hill Day 1918 [manuscript title].
City of Boston Public Celebrations Bunker Hill Day 1918 [manuscript title].
City of Boston Public Celebrations Bunker Hill Day 1918 [manuscript title].
City of Boston Public Celebrations Bunker Hill Day 1918 [manuscript title].
City of Boston Public Celebrations Bunker Hill Day 1918 [manuscript title].
City of Boston Public Celebrations Bunker Hill Day 1918 [manuscript title].
City of Boston Public Celebrations Bunker Hill Day 1918 [manuscript title].
City of Boston Public Celebrations Bunker Hill Day 1918 [manuscript title].
City of Boston Public Celebrations Bunker Hill Day 1918 [manuscript title].
City of Boston Public Celebrations Bunker Hill Day 1918 [manuscript title].
City of Boston Public Celebrations Bunker Hill Day 1918 [manuscript title].

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City of Boston Public Celebrations Bunker Hill Day 1918 [manuscript title].

Oblong 4to (11.25” x 15.5”), flexible black cloth, cord tie at spine. 29 silver print photographs (7.625” x 9.625”), 25 of which have manuscript captions. CONDITION: Album very good, very light wear to covers and a couple .25” tears to right margin of pp.; photographs very good, excellent tonality.

A lively photo album documenting the celebrations of Bunker Hill Day just five months before the end of the first world war.

Bunker Hill Day gained particular significance in 1918 because, as the Boston Globe emphasized, “this 143d anniversary of the battle finds the Americans and the British no longer enemies, but allies, in another great struggle against oppression and despotism.” Calvin Coolidge, then the Lieutenant-Governor of Massachusetts (he became president in 1923), is dramatically pictured just beneath the statue of Colonel William Prescott. His speech, condemning “Prussian military despotism,” stressed an even “deeper significance” of the day, as a timely reminder to fight for equality and “The law of progress and civilization” over “the development of the superman and the claim that he has of right dominion over the rest of his inferiors on earth,” which he called “the law of the jungle.”

In addition to picturing Coolidge, photographs in this album show the other two speakers at the Bunker Hill Monument, Boston Mayor Andrew J. Peters and Massachusetts politician Peter Francis Tague, who served as master of ceremonies; numerous scenes of the vast parade (including “Brig.-Gen. Wm. H. Oakes, Chief Marshall, and Staff, Approaching Reviewing Stand,” the “Boston Fire Dept.,” “Spanish War Veterans,” and the “Mothers, Wives, Daughters and Sisters of Officers and Enlisted Men,” led by “a boy of six carrying a flag with a sign across his chest, reading ‘My Pa Gave His Life for His Country! What Will You Give?’”—at this point, according to the Globe, “Many caught their breath as their emotions got the better of them”); and several more festive views of “Holiday Crowds” at Midway and “Gaelic Football at Sullivan Square Playground.”

REFERENCES: “5000 In Parade to Bunker Hill,” The Boston Globe, June 18, 1918, pp. 1–2. 

Item #7990

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