Item #8562 The Looking-Glass for the Mind; or Intellectual Mirror. Being an Elegant Collections of the Most Delightful Little Stories, and Interesting Tales, Chiefly translated from that much admired work L’Ami Des Enfans. Arnaud. Alexander Anderson Berquin.
The Looking-Glass for the Mind; or Intellectual Mirror. Being an Elegant Collections of the Most Delightful Little Stories, and Interesting Tales, Chiefly translated from that much admired work L’Ami Des Enfans.

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The Looking-Glass for the Mind; or Intellectual Mirror. Being an Elegant Collections of the Most Delightful Little Stories, and Interesting Tales, Chiefly translated from that much admired work L’Ami Des Enfans.

New York: Evert Duyckinck, 1807. 12 mo (7” x 4.25”), original full tree calf, morocco title stamp. Illus. title, iv, 203 pp., wood engravings throughout (some hand-colored later with varying quality). Early Ownership inscription of one “Catharine Floyd. Sen” in ink on ffep and on title reading “C. Floyd.” CONDITION: Very good, some wear at extremities, splitting at front inner and outer hinges but binding intact, cracked inner front hinge but still mostly attached, one sprung gathering (pgs. 195–202).

With Wood engravings by Alexander Anderson, the “father of American wood-engraving.” Alexander Anderson (1775-1870) was born in New York, the son of Sarah Lockwood and John Anderson, the publisher of the rebel newspaper The Constitutional Gazette. His artistic ability became evident at an early age and he soon developed a strong sense of art as a vocation. Nevertheless, his parents prevailed on him to study medicine, apprenticing him to Doctor Joseph Young at the age of fourteen. In 1795, he was appointed resident physician at Bellevue Hospital, during a yellow fever epidemic. The treatment options being limited, he witnessed many perish. Things turned worse still during another epidemic in 1798, during which he lost his wife, infant child, both parents, his brother, and most of his friends to the disease. Anderson left medicine soon afterwards and entered the field of professional engraving, enjoying a long and highly productive career. Anderson’s contribution to the visual culture of the nineteenth century was enormous, his wood engravings (or stereotypes from them) illustrating countless publications. REFERENCES: Shaw and Shoemaker 12111; Welch 76.9.

Item #8562

Price: $200.00

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